Dealing with COVID-19

What do I do if I have flu-like symptoms / fever?

 

– Stay home and mind yourself
– Avoid other people
– Drink lots of water
– Take pain killers / fever medication (ibuprofen, aspirin, paracetamol)

What if I think this might be COVID-19?

– Do not go to the GP or Emergency Room
– Phone your GP (Click here if you don’t have a GP yet)
– Phone HSE live: 1850 24 1850 they will give advice or send someone to your home to test you
– If HSE live do not answer, or you have very bad symptoms, call 112 or 999, they’ll ask “which service…?”, say “ambulance”, then talk to the ambulance person and explain the situation.

Would the state medical system help me? (HSE)

– Yes, all residents are entitled to medical treatment (Check out Citizens Information for more info.)
– You can never be refused necessary treatment
– For non-EU students the charges can be high but it should be covered by your insurance
– They do not ask about your visa status but to calculate costs they might want to check you are a resident

What if I need a doctor for some other reason (not COVID-19) ?

– GPs are the best.

What if it’s the middle of the night and I need a doctor for some other reason (not COVID-19)?

– You can see a doctor out of hours. Find the local service for your area on this page  (This type of doctor’s visit generally costs 50 to 70 Euro. If the doctor thinks you need to go to the hospital he will give you a “referral”.)

Should I go to the Emergency Department (ED)?

– Do not go to the Emergency department right now if you have fever and cough or if you think you have COVID-19.
– Emergencies are generally things like a broken leg or a burst appendix. Here’s a list of situations when we should go to the emergency department.

Be cautious not anxious!

Learning English in Dublin grows in popularity

More and more students from around the world are learning English in Dublin as the Irish capital’s reputation for good schools such as Englishour continues to grow.

 

Are there good schools for learning English in Dublin? (¿Hay buenas escuelas para aprender inglés en Dublín?; Existem boas escolas para aprender inglês em Dublin?; Ci sono buone scuole per imparare l’inglese a Dublino?)

 

Yes, Dublin has become one of the most attractive places for foreign students to study in, thanks to a large number of good quality English language schools.

 

Where can I learn English in Dublin?

 

Schools such as Englishour offer the very best English language teaching because they are smaller and provide more personalised classes to students as well as one-on-one tuition.

 

Where is the best place to learn English in Ireland and the United Kingdom?

 

Dublin is now recognised worldwide as a centre of excellence for learning English as a foreign language. The city is also very welcoming to students and presents plenty of opportunities for working – and having fun.

 

¿Dónde se puede aprender inglés en Irlanda?

 

Dublín es un excelente lugar para estudiar, ya que ofrece a los estudiantes enseñanza de alta calidad y oportunidades de trabajo.

 

Onde se pode aprender inglês na Irlanda?

 

Dublin é um excelente lugar para estudar, pois oferece aos alunos ensino de alta qualidade e oportunidades de trabalho.

 

Dove puoi imparare l’inglese in Irlanda?

 

Dublino è un luogo eccellente in cui studiare in quanto offre agli studenti insegnamenti di alta qualità e opportunità di lavoro.

 

Name a good English language school in Ireland.

 

Englishour continues to build on its excellent reputation around the world for providing the best in English language teaching.

 

¿Cuáles son las mejores escuelas de idiomas en Dublín? (Quais são as melhores escolas de idiomas em Dublin? Quali sono le migliori scuole di lingua a Dublino?)

 

Englishour in Dublin city centre is widely recognised for providing high-quality English lessons to foreign students. Its team of professional and passionate teachers will teach you how to speak English very comfortably in formal work situations and in your daily lives.

 

Do all English language schools in Ireland and the UK have exams as part of their courses?

 

At Englishour, we help all our students prepare for the exams that they must take when their course is complete: Cambridge, IELTS, TEOIC or TIE. We do this by working in one-to-one situations while you are studying.

 

Do English schools in Dublin find accommodation for foreign students?

 

Englishour provides places to live throughout the city for its students. We use a mix of host families and residences.

 

Are English-teaching schools in Ireland regulated?

 

Schools should be accredited and have ‘quality marks’ from the Accreditation and Coordination of English Language Services (ACELS) or Marketing English in Ireland (MEI). Englishour is recognised by both.

 

How do you know if an English language school in Ireland is ‘good’?

 

Englishour prides itself on being able to work closely with every single student who enrolls with us. Our teachers are extremely passionate about what they do and work very hard to ensure that students excel.

 

Is Dublin a fun city to learn English in?

 

The city is known for being very friendly and foreign students who come here to learn English always enjoy and say it’s hard to leave.

 

Where is Englishour located?

 

Englishour now has three locations in Dublin city centre, making it easily accessible for all students in the city.

 

To find out more about learning English as a foreign language in Ireland, go here. You can also phone us directly on +35318786333, email the team on info@englishour.ie or go here.

Deciding a Cheap English School in Dublin

Cheap English School Dublin

Which cheap English School in Dublin is the best for me

Sometimes when choosing an English school, we are spoilt for choice! In the Dublin area, there are over one hundred English language schools. Some are cheap schools and some are expensive and they are also very different when it comes to quality. We know what we can afford (which rules out a lot of the more expensive schools) but how can we tell if any of the cheap English school in Dublin is best?

Read the reviews

Use other people’s experience to form a picture of the school you are investigating. People tend to post reviews when they ae very happy or very unhappy with a school so read these reviews to see what previous students have thought. Generally, with negative reviews, there tends to be truth in a complaint which has been repeated by a number of people. Look for comments about the teachers and about how the students were treated in the office. If the school administration does not treat students well, then this is probably a school to avoid.

On the positive side, reviews which compliment a cheap English school in Dublin and its teachers can help you to narrow down your choice towards finding the right school for you.

Look for the language

Language schools are just that – schools which teach language. Look for clues which show that they are passionate about teaching language and not just businesses to earn money. Look at their websites. Have they written original content about language? Look at their social media pages. Again, do they post content about language or are their pages simply marketing tools to find more students? There are schools out there who care deeply about teaching English. Find these schools and make your choice.

Look at the size of a cheap English school in Dublin

Language schools often start out with the greatest intentions. When they are young they care about each student individually, but as success comes, students stop being faces and start being numbers. Teachers who before worked in an organisation they felt cared about them and were innovative in their industry now feel like cogs in a giant wheel and of course, it is the students who suffer. The message here is certainly not that all big schools are bad, just some of them. Look for a school which you feel can offer you the individual support you need as well as the school facilities.

Recognition

In Ireland, there are quality marks which assure minimum levels of quality in schools. With these marks, the schools are open to independent inspectors who can check if they are doing what they say they do, both academically and from an administrative point of view. Look for quality marks such as ACELS or MEI. You can see their lists of members at https://www.acels.ie/schools or https://mei.ie/

Teachers

Your teacher is the most important element of your course as it is they who you have primary contact with each and every day. A good teacher can guide you through the language and a great teacher can inspire you for the rest of your life. When you are making contact with a school, ask as many questions as you like. Regarding teachers, there are two questions you can ask: Are your teachers native speakers? What is the combined teaching experience of your teachers? The way schools answer your questions will give you a clue as to how they might treat you in the future should you become a student and of course, the more you can learn about their teachers the better. Happy, well-paid teachers give the best classes!

What every student would like is a well-located, friendly and professional school which will teach you the English language. In your search for any cheap English school Dublin, consider the above points and we wish you the best of luck! If you need any more help or information on this topic, please contact john@englishour.ie

By the way, one last thing. The word ‘cheap’ in English can have a negative connotation meaning ‘poor quality’. A positive way of saying ‘cheap’ is ‘inexpensive’. So here a cheap English school in Dublin means any school whose prices are optimum without compromising quality.

Know about another tools of the trade and that is Quick English Learning.

 

Auxiliary verbs – the signals of time.

Auxiliary verbs tell us the time of the action

Auxiliary verbs are fantastic little things!

They act like mini-discourse markers at the beginning of sentences, except instead of signaling an emotion or intent, they signal a time. That’s how we know when an action happened in a question or a negative form, by the auxiliary.
Discourse markers are words or phrases which prepare the listener for what is to come. Like if you’re driving and you see a signpost which tells you that your destination is 200km away and to the left. The sign not only tells you the distance and which way to turn, it also mentally prepares you for the journey ahead. It gets you thinking about whether or not you need petrol, if you need to go to the toilet. You think about when you will stop for a break, now or towards the end of the journey? That sign situates you within your journey. It offers you comfort and the power to make informed decisions. Signposts are important not only for telling us where to go but also for making us feel more comfortable whilst going there.
In language we use signposts too. If a teacher is talking to a student and says I read your essay. Unfortunately…. The student gasps upon hearing this word. There is a small intake of breath as they prepare themselves for what surely will be bad news. Can I be blunt with you? Another signpost. Whatever they are going to say, it’s probably terrible! They will tell me some horrible truth about myself. The answer to can I be blunt with you? is of course, always yes! As human beings we are naturally curious about other’s perception of ourselves. I’ve got some good news and some bad news is an old favourite. Which do you want to hear first?
Which brings me back to auxiliary verbs. They are words like is, was, have, do, will and did. They go with a verb and through them we know the tense. For example, if I ask do you walk to work?, you know that I am asking if you walk to work generally, every day, usually. Did you walk to work? Now we’re talking about a specific point in the past. But that’s an important idea. The listener must know when you are talking about if you use did. They know because you either say it or it’s implicit in the idea. If you walk up to a person and ask did you go to the cinema?, their impulse is to immediately ask when? They need a time because you asked did.

Auxiliary verbs are like little clocks…arrows pointing through space-time.

If I ask have you walked to work?, it’s not necessary to specify the time. Have you implies a time before now. Any time. Have you been to Japan? Yes? When? Now you talk in the past. I went three years ago etc. Have you been …ing? Again, the listener knows that the question refers to recently, to a time close to now. This is the present perfect continuous tense, a tense we use when we see evidence of an action. For example, I see someone out of breath (the evidence) and I ask have you been running? As soon as they hear have you been…? They know that my question refers to something recently and also to some evidence that they have spotted. If someone asks you out of the blue have you been sewing? You would most probably respond with why do you ask? You are wondering what possible evidence they see to ask whether or not you have been sewing.

In class, students often have a problem between the simple past (I did), the present perfect (I have done) and the present perfect continuous (I’ve been doing). There is no need for this to be problematic as long as you think about them in relation to time. I did requires a specific named past time. Either you say it or the other person knows exactly what time you are referring to. If you name the time, use the simple past and NOT the present perfect. The present perfect refers to an action which happened in an unnamed time in the past but has importance for now. Perhaps a message for now. If you say I’ve eaten, the message for now is I’m not hungry. If you say I’ve done everything to your boss, the message for now is perhaps can I go now?
If you name the time, use the simple past and NOT the present perfect
Having said all of that, there is a challenge for students regarding understanding the concept. It is often not the same in other languages and does need time to sink in. The good news (nice discourse marker!) is that there is a ‘eureka’ moment. A moment when the student suddenly gets it. It’s one of those really satisfying moments when learning a language which can be so frustrating at times.
In the meantime, learners need to be as aware as possible of those little magic words, auxiliary verbs.

Learning a language – After frustration comes reward!

Learn English in Ireland

Learning a language can be frustrating

It is exciting to be able to speak another language. It can of course be frustrating too. Not being able to articulate what you want or how you feel or what your opinion is on something can feel terrible. Being with a group of native speakers and not being able to follow the group conversation can leave you feeling alone.


Many years ago, when I arrived in Spain for a year of teaching English, this was exactly how I felt. When I arrived, my Spanish was nil. I didn’t even know the word for ‘hello’. I had a little Spanish/English dictionary and a notebook, and I started to learn words and phrases, as I needed them. If I were going food shopping, for example, I would pre-learn the words which I anticipated I would need for my shopping expedition. Leaving my house, I would be repeating the words for ‘bread’ and tomato’ and ‘pork chop’ as I wandered down the foreign street surrounded by signs and people I didn’t understand.

New friends can appear in surprising places

I lived in a small flat with two Spanish guys who didn’t speak a word of English. It was perfect for me to immerse myself in Spanish. For the first couple of months we were like three mime artists in the kitchen, acting out what we were going to cook, flapping our arms to show the rent was due and whatever other messages they needed to pass to me or I to them. At that time, I used to go home for lunch every day and sitting opposite Miguel, I would have conversations with him in my broken language but I was only half sure what we were talking about. But every one seeped in somehow and slowly my brain was accepting this new form of communication.


Then I got really lucky. One evening (still early in my time there) while waiting for a friend outside her school (she was teaching an English class) I was watching a television match in a shop window. There was another guy there also watching the match, and it turned out that he was waiting for his girlfriend who was inside and was one of my friend’s students. We started talking in the usual mime/stone age man-type language, and when they came out we all went for a beer together. This marked the beginning of my friendship with Emilio and Maria Jose.


Every Friday they invited me out with their large group of friends. I remember the first ten minutes always going well, everybody sober, talking slowly to me and me listening intently, trying to follow the conversation. Then the beers kept coming and the conversation got faster, the lights got brighter and everything became more garbled. People would look at me and see that I didn’t understand and would stop the group to bring me up to date but I hated that as I felt that I was ruining the dynamic of the group. I didn’t want them to stop just to keep me up to date.

Learning a language can be lonely

I felt lonely. I was surrounded by friends, but they were friends who I couldn’t really communicate with apart from smiles and a nodding of my head.
I returned to Ireland for Christmas and when I went back in early January and something strange happened to me. I started to understand! It was if my absence for a couple of weeks had given my brain the time to digest all the backlog of new language I had, and it was now able to run past my lips with a degree of fluidity. Words I heard or read began to have meaning and I felt that I was no longer a beginner, but someone on a (slightly) higher rung of the language ladder.


Breaking through this barrier felt so good! I still had many problems understanding and expressing myself of course, but this was peppered with the joy of catching a word, or a difficult expression which I actually understood! I began to feel that their language was now also becoming my language. It was something we shared rather than something that separated us.

Speaking another language feels wonderful

This experience informs what I do today in my English classes. I feel that the job of the English teacher is to empower the learner. To give the learner ‘bullets’ for their ‘language gun’. I know the joy of being able to express oneself beautifully in another language (or at least thinking I do) and to be able to understand subtlety coming from someone else’s lips. When that happens, all the frustration and loneliness suffered at the beginning becomes worth it.


Often students say that they feel that they have stopped learning. That they have reached a plateau or even worse have regressed and are now understanding less. This, unfortunately, is the game of learning a language. It’s swings and roundabouts, highs and lows. But like all the great things in life you have to work. You have to suffer before the good stuff comes. And it does come… just ask anyone who has done it!

By John Ryan

8 Surprising Things About Dublin

Temple bar dublin

Here are some interesting and surprising facts about Dublin city.

Dublin has more than 750 pubs!

Dublin is known throughout the world for its unrivalled pubs and nightlife, so it’s not really a surprise that the city has over 750 pubs. The Brazen Head (just near the Guiness brewery) is one of the oldest pubs in the world, first opening in 1168! The real surprise, however, is that Dublin has the fewest pubs per person than any other capital city in Europe!

Dublin means ‘Black Pool’
Dublin comes from the Gaelic phrase ‘Dubh Linn’, which can be translated to ‘Black Pool’. The name’s thought to originate from the dark, large lake situated between the River Liffey and the River Poddle. The lake’s long disappeared, replaced by Dublin Castle’s Dubh Linn gardens.

If you really want to impress family and friends, though, you could use the official Irish name for Dublin, Baile Átha Cliath, which is translated as ‘Town of the Hurdled Ford’.

St. Valentine is buried in Dublin
If you think Paris is the capital of love, you’re in for a surprise! The remains of St Valentine, the patron saint of lovers, are kept at the Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church and you can visit his shrine there, too.

The O’Connell Bridge is wider than long
The O’Connell Bridge’s unique dimensions make it famous throughout Europe, being wider than it is long at an amazing 49metres! Up until 1863, Dublin only had a weak rope bridge, so the city’s come a long, long way.

Dublin is one of UNESCO’s cities of literature
Dublin has a brilliant reputation for literary excellence, being home to numerous famous authors, including Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, W.B. Yeats and George Bernard Shaw.With multiple libraries, publishing companies and literary institutions, bookworms are in heaven here!

More UNESCO cities of literature include: Norwich, England; Reykjavik, Iceland; Edinburgh, Scotland; Melbourne, Australia and Iowa City, USA. See http://www.cityofliterature.com/cities-of-literature/cities-of-literature/dublin/ for details.

You’ll never run out of Guinness
Dublin’s most famous brewery is not only Dublin’s oldest business and a tourist attraction you should definitely visit, but you can rest assured there’ll be plenty of time to visit it. The Guinness Brewery is on a leasehold of 9,000 years, which expires in the year 10,759!

Dublin’s twin cities
Whilst you may not think twinned cities provide any benefits, it helps cities maintain good commercial and financial links. Dublin is twinned with a number of cities, including Liverpool, England; Barcelona, Spain and San Jose, California.

Dublin boasts Europe’s largest city park
If you’re looking for the perfect outdoor space to practice your English skills, you’ll be spoilt for choice. With over 2,000 hectares of parkland and miles of cycling and walking paths, the Phoenix Park is the largest in Europe. Dublin Zoo is also based here, which is second in size only to New York’s Central Park.